Optimizing Performance in D1 Football – Coach Mack Brown and Dr. John Ivy

Optimizing Performance in D1 Football – Coach Mack Brown and Dr. John Ivy


– Good afternoon. Welcome to the 2018 Don
Nehlen Lecture Series. My name is Valerie Wayda, I am the chair of the Department of
Coaching and Teaching Studies in the College of Physical
Activity and Sport Sciences. Just a quick little announcement, our Dean’s Advisory Board
always does a fundraiser for a senior scholarship,
and if you haven’t done so, they have some items that
you can purchase tickets for, for a raffle. So, on your way out, please consider. About two decades ago,
Coach Nehlen established a lecture series bringing leaders in the coaching profession to campus. The first speaker in 2001
was Coach Bo Schembechler, and the caliber of speakers
has continued over the years. I’ve only Coach Nehlen for nine years, since I’ve been back in Morgantown, and we all know what an incredible coach and individual he is, all his
attributes that he’s received, and the impact he’s had on WVU football. But there’s one thing I’ve
really observed about this man. He doesn’t take no for an answer. And that’s been a really
good thing, because as we’ve asked individuals to come back for this lecture series,
he continues to call, I do believe, tenaciously,
until they respond, and give us a yes. And, you know what, we’re
all benefits of that. That we can bring back
these incredible speakers, to share not only with our students, but also to the WVU community. And so with that, I’d
really like to recognize Coach Nehlen, and his
contributions, that continue. (group applauds) As we talked about this year’s speaker, the group that Don Nehlen
and the rest of the Athletic Coaching Education
faculty are part of, we really wanted to look
at a, what we considered a leader in the coaching profession, who really embraced the use of science, to really inform their coaching. And with that, I’m gonna
introduce Doctor Guy Hornsby, who is one of our faculty members, who heard the dual speakers
speak a few years back about this, and when Guy talked about it, again Coach Nehlen’s
like, “Oh this is easy, “I know him, he’s my good friend.” So with that, Doctor Hornsby. (group applauds) – Thanks, Val. So to give a little bit more background to what Doctor Wayda was talking about, with it being the 85th
anniversary of CPASS, we started kinda toying
around with the idea of doing something special,
and putting together something a little bit unique. And, that coupled with
something we’ve been trying to develop within our own
academic coaching program, and that is through both
curriculum and through providing experience and
research to students, we’ve been trying to build
our sports science component, and applied sports science component, and so that’s from everything from, recently had a class approved
through Faculty Senate called Introduction to Sport
Technology and Sport Science. We’ve been building through collaborations with other groups on campus, the Rockefeller Neuroscience
Institute, for example, working with Doctor Josh Hagen. We’ve been able to
establish some relationships within WVU athletics. Really getting excited
about what we’re doing, as well as within the field
of applied sport science as we’re seeing it grow, more and more. One of the things that we
started to talk about, though, is yes, this applied sports
science world is growing, but at the same time,
sometimes I would hear people talk about it like science
of coaching is something that’s brand new, or
people that are kind of getting out of their
silos, and collaborating, and coordinating efforts,
and listening to one another, and being on the same team,
like if that’s something new, and Doctor Wayda mentions,
I saw Coach Brown at NSCA, as the keynote speaker, and
he talked about this work he had done with Doctor
Ivy, and he actually said if you’re not working and
reaching out across campus, if you’re not working with say
the kinesiology department, you’re missing out. And so that was kind of
the impetus for that. First I would like to
introduce Doctor John Ivy to give you guys some
background of Doctor Ivy’s work, he’ll talk about his relationships and his work with the University of Texas, and with Coach Brown, but, I
remember as a strength coach, nutrient timing, which so,
for all of you that see the shakes, in the
shelves, and in the stores, and these commercials,
the post-workout shake, the carbohydrate protein,
that work was pioneered by Doctor Ivy. Doctor Ivy was kind enough
this morning to give a little talk and go over,
basically his life’s work, a summary, and it really
is incredible to see years and years and years of one question leading to another question,
leading to another question, that ends up being a situation
of not only do we understand things better in terms
of muscle metabolism, or acute and chronic
responses to exercise, or protein synthesis. It led eventually to the point of it helps practitioners, it helps athletes better understand how
to go about both, within post-exercise, as well as
long-term nutrition for athletes. Doctor Ivy was University of Texas, he was a faculty member
there for 31 years. 13 as the department chair of kinesiology and health sciences. He has established
relationships and been on, fellow of the American
College of Sports Medicine, he’s worked with numerous groups, including the American
Diabetes Association, over 180 peer-reviewed
articles, and his book, Nutrient Timing, which I
remember getting in high school, is something that I recommend
to every practitioner in the coaching strength
conditioning world. Doctor Ivy. (group applauds) – Well, thank you very much. I’m delighted to be invited
to give this presentation to honor Don Nehlen who
has done so much good work at the university here, but
within athletics in general. I mean he is someone that
all coaches can look up to, because he did it the right way. I have the highest respect
for him, and the work that he did over the many years he was coach here, I think 20 years, if I’m not mistaken. So, it is a pleasure for me to be here. When I was asked to give this talk too, I was thinking, the guy said,
“I want you to come and talk, “about your interactions with
athletics, and Coach Brown, “and then Coach Brown’s gonna
talk,” and I was thinking, gee, this is like opening up
for The Beatles, you know. Coach Brown’s a tremendous
speaker, as you will see, and so, it’s a hard act to
precede what he’s doing, or going to do. But I’ll give it the
best shot I have, and so, I really broke my talk up
into basically five areas. One was just a little bit
about me, so that you see that I had some type
of athletic background, and can appreciate what
coaches go through. Two, a little bit of history
of collegiate athletics, and how that influenced, for many years, the way coaches approach academia. Then, talk about my early
years at University of Texas, when there wasn’t really
any type of relationship between the department of
kinesiology and athletics. In fact, there was a
pretty large brick wall between the two, although
we shared the same building. Then, the things that
transpired within my department, and Coach Brown coming to the University, and the influence he had over
improving the interactions between the kinesiology
department and athletics, and then, what I see in the
future, what’s gonna happen, if programs are gonna stay at the top. So, just a little bit about me, I was a all-around high school athlete. I was raised around the
shipyards of Virginia, a pretty tough area. My father left school in the 7th grade, he lost his father, and
he had to go to work to support his family
during the depression. And one of the things that
he always beat into my head, and my brother’s head, was,
you will get an education. And, he wanted me to go to college. The only way I was going to college was if I had some financial aid, and so, I just loved athletics,
and I did go to college on a athletic scholarship. I was actually the first
person in my family to go to college, and to graduate. Upon graduation, I decided,
I actually, I played one year of professional baseball,
and then I decided to go to graduate school, and I went to University of Maryland, and while I was at the
University of Maryland, in the spring semester I got a call from a high school coach in Hampton, Virginia, who I had played against in high school. And he offered me a job coaching. And I had always wanted to try coaching, but I hadn’t given it much thought, but I kinda wanted to try it. And, he told me, he said, “John, if you come and
be my backfield coach, “and you coach the baseball
team, we’ll give you $9,000,” $1,000 a month, you know, nine months. And I thought, man, this is great. And then he said, “We’ll
give you $600 for coaching,” and I thought this was just
out of sight, you know, they’re gonna actually pay me to coach. (laughs) So, I was all enthused about doing this, and I went, and I taught
biology, and coached football and baseball for two years. And there was something
about graduate school that I really enjoyed. I just loved the idea of
going to these classes, and studying the things that
I was really interested in, and doing research, and I
decided to give up coaching, and go back to school. I was often asked, back then,
“Why did you give up coaching, “if you liked it so much?” And I said, well I, I was
too vain to be a coach. And they said, “What?” And I said, yeah, you
don’t know the stress that’s in coaching and
all, and within 10 years, you’ve got white hair, man. I couldn’t put up with that. So, I decided to– – Yeah, look at my hair. – Yeah. (laughs) Actually I had a PowerPoint
presentation I was gonna show, but then they told me he didn’t have it, and I had Coach Brown when he came to the University of Texas
and he had dark hair. And when he left the
University of Texas… (laughs) So, you don’t know this, unless you coach, you don’t know the stresses that are, and the hours that are put in. In fact, when I was coaching high school, my first year, I had a
girlfriend, and she said, “All it is is football,
football, football, “and now it’s baseball,
baseball, baseball.” And we didn’t make, we
didn’t quite make it a year. (laughs) And I went on, and continued coaching, but I didn’t have a girlfriend anymore. So, but anyway, I went to graduate school, and I was quite interested,
still in sports, and did a lot of research
that related to sports, and continued to do that after I left. And my work, then, I’ve had
the background in coaching, to some extent, and I’ve
worked with a lot of top athletes in the world, you know, guys like Michael Phelps
and Hunter Kemper, and guys like that to help
them improve their performance in nutrition and so forth. Now let’s turn to collegiate
athletics a little bit. And we can look at how
it got started, really, you know the first
collegiate athletic team, and actually it was an intramural team, was at Yale University, in 1847. It was a rowing team. A couple years after that,
Harvard developed a team. I think it was in 1849 that
Harvard’s team started. In 1953, and these were just
intramural teams at the time, there was no intercollegiate
athletics, but in 1953, the Baltimore Concord
Montreal Railroad Company decided to increase their advertisement, and try to get more passengers on, and what they did was they
came to Harvard and Yale, and asked them to have
a rowing competition at Lake Winnipesaukee, in New Hampshire. And all expenses paid, for the teams. They would go up there and
get an eight day vacation. So things haven’t changed, you know, money started collegiate athletics, money drives collegiate athletics today. But back then, baseball started in 1959, that was Amherst against Williams College, was the first college baseball game. 1869, it was football,
Rutgers versus Princeton. And the coaches back then
were actually students. And they were big, big guys on campus. They were voted in, they
selected the players, they set up the training programs, they set up game strategies, whatever. The popularity of sports became
very big though, with time. Collegiate athletics started, or colleges started to realize
that winning was prestigious, and alumni started seeing this as well. And this started a number
of sort of dubious practices that were going on, where non-students were competing for universities. Universities were trying
to recruit athletes away from other universities. Students were being paid to play on teams. Can you imagine this stuff going on? At any rate, there needed
to be some control over it, and the presidents took over control, and also there are a lot of
rules that were not established. Actually football rules
still weren’t established, and there were a lot of
injuries and actually over a 10 year period, there
were 18 deaths in the 1800s due to playing football. That would stop football today, right, back then it didn’t, but,
it would stop it today. So there were rules that
needed to be made up, and so presidents got together,
they started hiring coaches who were part of the faculty. Not athletic department,
part of the faculty. They were expected to do some teaching, as well as coaching. But as the popularity
rose, coaches somewhat, they wanted to spend more time coaching, and less time teaching, and
they also didn’t want to report to academic administrators,
and they wanted more freedom, athletic departments
started being developed. To show you how important it was back then to have a good coach, in 1890,
the University of Chicago hired Amos Alonzo Stagg to be their coach. And the idea was, he was to
improve their football team to increase the prestige
and visibility of the team. Now why would they want to do that? Well, back then, and up
until about World War II, when the G.I. Bill was
available, for people to go to college, you weren’t
expected to go to college, and in fact, you were discouraged from it, because you could make
more money by going out, getting an apprenticeship,
learning a trade, and going to work right
away, from high school or junior high school or wherever. So college was for the elite. They were people that had
time to waste, basically, is how it was visioned. So, at University of Chicago in 1890, when they didn’t have a
very good football team, their student enrollment
was 1,500 students. In 10 years after Stagg came
in and made them a powerhouse, their enrollment went to 5,500. Now that was big, and that
meant a lot more money coming in to the university. University of Yale, or
Yale University, in… See was 1890, has a
football revenue of $2,800. In 1903, it went to $106,000, in just
that short period of time. Which at the time was 1/8 the revenue brought in by Yale University. So presidents saw the value
from a financial standpoint, and from pleasing alumni, et cetera, that athletics could be important. And conferences started, the NCAA started, rules became more structured, and universities started
developing athletic departments that were separate from academia. And course coaches wanted this, because they wanted to
spend more time coaching, they didn’t particularly want to teach, and they didn’t want to be
under academic authority, or departments, heads, and so forth. Now that brings me to, basically, the environment in which I ran into, when I first came to
University of Texas in 1982. And it was throughout,
and I think is generally, in coaching overall, is
that athletic departments wanted to stay separated from academia. They wanted to do their own thing, they didn’t want to have any influence, that to be influenced, and so, working with an academic
department was not sought. In fact it was discouraged. The other thing is, is athletic
departments have to be, or athletic teams have
to be somewhat guarded, because what goes on on
a team, has to be held within a team, and you
have to trust the people you’re working with. And so you just can’t
open it up to everybody. Just think about, you know,
well, if a player is injured, the week before a game, and that gets out, and you don’t want it out. Or, if there is some of type
of problem within the team, you don’t want it all over the newspaper, and those types of things, so
you have to be able to trust the people that are
working in the program. And so when I came to
the University of Texas, there was no interaction at all between my department and athletics. And pretty much a wall was built there, I mean, we were in the same building, we shared the same building,
but there was no interaction. My first interaction with athletics was in about 1984, and I
was sitting in my office and I got a call from Peter Snell. And Peter Snell is one
of the world’s greatest middle-distance runners. He won three gold medals
in 800 and 1,500 meters. He held five world records. He’s considered actually
probably the greatest middle-distance runner ever. He’s the only person since the 1920s, since 1920 Olympics that won
both the 800 and 1500 meter gold medals at the Olympics. So anyway I’m sitting on
the phone, I said Peter, I knew Peter because Peter,
after his career running, came to the United States,
he’s from New Zealand, came to the United States, got his BS from University of California, Davis, then went and worked with Phil Golnick at Washington State and got his Ph.D. in exercise physiology,
and then was at the University of Texas
Southwest Medical Center, there, on faculty. And I knew Peter from American
College of Sports Medicine. So anyway, I got this
call out of the blue, and I said, Peter, what’s going on? He says, “Look guys, a
couple of athletic trainers “up here from the University of Texas, “down there in Austin, and
they wanted me to design “a pre-football game meal,
and I told them I said, “you’re in the wrong place,
you need to be talking to “John Ivy, who’s right next door to you, “go back and talk to John.” And so he called me up and said that, so I sent him back to you,
and I said, okay thanks, so the next day, yeah sure enough, two guys that are
athletic trainers came in, and back then there
weren’t any nutritionists on staff at Texas. I said, how can I help you, and they said, “We’d like for you to
develop a pre-game meal “for our upcoming game against so-and-so,” I can’t remember who it was now. And I said, okay, what time
is the game, and you know, when do you guys usually
eat the pre-game meal, and asked a bunch of questions. And so I sit down, and I spent
probably six or seven hours on this, because I looked
up some stuff about digestion rates of certain
foods that I was gonna recommend and things like that, because
you really want to provide the calories, but you don’t
want it sit on the stomach for a long time, and wants
to be easily digested, and so forth. So I gave it to ’em, and you
know, Texas won the game, I do remember that, and I was
feeling real good about it. A few days later I happened
to see one of ’em in the hall, ’cause no one had ever come back to me and said anything about it, and I said, hey, how’d that meal go, and they said, “We didn’t do it.” I said well, why not? They said, “Well, Coach Akers
said we eat steak and eggs “before every game, and
we’re gonna continue to eat “steak and eggs before every game.” Coach Akers didn’t even know
anything about doing this, and so that was squashed right away. My second instant was the strength coach for the basketball team
came to me and said, “I want to change the training
paradigm a little bit, “and I want to see how
it’s affecting my athletes, “and could you do some
physiological testing for us, “to see how it’s going?” And I said sure, let’s
do some pre-testing, you know, come in. We scheduled the players
to come in, certain times. And we had set up the lab,
I’ve got my graduate students together, and all of this kind of stuff. We’re sitting there at eight
o’clock in the morning, waiting for somebody to
come in, no one shows up. So I call up the strength
coach and all, and said, this is before cell phones, by the way. So, we call up and
said, Bo didn’t show up, what’s going on? He says, “Oh, I don’t know,
but I’ll check on it.” And I said, okay, so the next day, another player shows
up, and he goes through, we had a battery of
tests we were gonna do, and he goes through one
test and he looks at me, and he says, “I’m not gonna do this. “I’m not on scholarship to do this.” And he walks out of lab. So I call the strength
coach back up and I said, hey, what’s going on? Aren’t these guys
interested in doing this, and you want this information,
I need some cooperation. He said, “Well, I really
can’t make ’em do it.” And I said well look, we’re
not gonna waste our time. And so we just stopped the
project, and didn’t do it. So my third instance was Richard Quick. Now remember there’s no
departmental stuff here, it just says, you know, somebody
asking you to do something. So Richard Quick, who was the swim coach, women’s swim coach at University of Texas, and had won four or five
national championships while there, calls me up, and
Richard, tremendous coach. He left Texas, went to
Stanford, and won seven more national championships or something. Unfortunately he died
a few years back, but, really tremendous swim coach. But anyway, Richard calls me up and says, “John, look I’ve got a problem this year. “I don’t know what’s happening, “but I’m training my athletes,” this is at the first of the season, “we’ve got a meet coming
up in about three weeks, “and performances are
actually dropping off, “I don’t know what’s going on.” And I said, okay Richard,
I’ll come over there, and is it alright if we
do some blood testing to find out what’s going on. So I went over from graduate students, we took some blood
samples before practice, which was at like 5:30 in the morning. And then after the practice,
we took some more blood samples and we measured things like
blood lactate, glucose, and so forth. Went back to the lab, the
first thing we measured was lactate, and we saw that
even when doing the hard part of the workout, these
women weren’t generating any blood lactate. So, right away I got suspicious
as to what’s going on. ‘Cause as intensity of exercise goes up, blood lactate is usually
gonna rise some, anyway. So then we looked at blood
glucose, and I was amazed. When we looked at the
pre-exercise samples, the women’s blood glucose
levels were around 50 to 60 milligrams percent,
and one was actually 45. Now normal is around 80 to 90. So they were coming in with
no carbohydrate in their body. So I took this back to
Richard, and I said, Richard, I need to talk to these swimmers, and find out what they’re
doing, so we can help ’em. So I quizzed them, I had a
survey, and they filled out what they ate for
breakfast, lunch and dinner, and basically what they
said was, they get up, early practice, they don’t eat breakfast. They work out. They leave workout, they
have to run to class. They go to early morning
class, and all their classes are in the morning,
’cause they have afternoon workouts as well. They would skip lunch because
they didn’t want to eat before the afternoon
practice, and then Richard was keeping ’em so late, they
couldn’t make dining hall. So the only time they
were eating was at night, and they were munching on things
like potato chips and Coke, and stuff like that. And so I went back to Richard and I said, this has got to change
if you want them perform, they’ve got to have a
better nutrition pattern. I said the first thing they’ve
gotta do in the morning, get up and you know,
anyway, we went through a series of things that they had to do. And performances came back. They actually won the
national championship again that year, and I
have a picture on my wall in my office of that
team, which they gave me, which I was very grateful for. But through those times,
those early times, there’s a couple of things that I learned. And those were, one, don’t get involved with an athletic team, unless
the head coach is behind it. Assistant coach, strength coach, whatever, athletic trainer, don’t get involved. Unless the head coach knows about it, and is behind it, it’s not gonna go. The other thing I learned is
that you have to establish clear objectives for a project, and get all parties onboard with it, and get the cooperation of the coach to have that done. So about 1989, I became chair of the department of kinesiology. I was good friends, from
the time I got there, DeLoss Dodds, who was the
athletic director from 1981 till probably 2015, I think
it was, something like that. I think he retired a
year or so after I did. But DeLoss and I were good
friends, and something happened, this really started to
open up things for us, working with athletics. The Athletic Training
Association changed rules, and NCAA changed some rules on who could be athletic trainers
and working with programs. And a student had to be part of a formal athletic training
program, academic program. And at Texas, what was
happening was students were volunteering to be athletic trainers, and they were getting hours doing that, and then going through certification without going through an academic program. All that changed. And so DeLoss came to me and
said, “Can you help us out, “can you start an academic program?” And I said, well, maybe. (laughs) That takes money. And I said, we will help you out, but, athletics is gonna have to pay for it. And so we worked out a deal,
where athletics sent money to the provost, provost
money then went to us, to fund that athletic training program, and so I was able to hire staff. We were able to start a
program, I hired an individual named Brian Farr, athletic
trainer, tremendous guy. Hardest worker you’ve ever seen. We had one of the best
athletic training programs in the country, bar none. We’ve got a 96% pass, first
test pass rate for the athletic training certification,
national certification, which is unheard of. But anyway, we were able
to start that program because of the help with athletics, and it was a good program for us to have. But both people won. We won, athletics won. They could not hire
enough athletic trainers with their, you know the cost of it. We were able to provide
these athletic trainers through internships that
helped the department, and it still goes on today. The next thing that I did
was I established a program called FIT, which stands for
Fitness Institute of Texas. And I started this program
for a couple of reasons, one, I wanted to have a
program in the department where our people that were
interested in fitness testing, setting up fitness programs,
cardiac rehab and so forth, had a place where they
could do an internship. The other, it was for revenue. I wanted to bring more
revenue in the department, so this program was going
to go out and do in-service, they were going to set
up training programs, weight training programs for individuals that wanted to increase
strength and so forth, but also weight loss
programs for faculty, staff, and so forth, and people pay for this. And also do physiological
testing on athletes in the community, or just
basic fitness testing for those individuals that
are interested in knowing their fitness level, body composition, and things of that nature. I also went to the university and I said, I’d like for the university
to help fund this program, because what we can do is,
any student that comes into a physical education
class, we’ll test them at the beginning of class,
at the end of the class, so they can see their
progress, and increasing their physical fitness levels. And the university bid
on that, and they gave us x amount of money per year,
to help staff the program, and we would test, free
of charge, these students, put their information
online, keep it historically, and so forth. Then I went to athletics, and DeLoss. And this is where Matt comes in. Up until that time there, like I said, there was no real interaction
with athletes directly, with our department and athletics. And everything was on a
kind of a one-on-one basis, you know, if somebody
asks you to do something, you would try and help ’em out. But, you know, a lot of times,
athletic teams want to know body composition on their players, they want to know their fitness level, they want to know
whether training programs are helping or not, and so forth. I went to DeLoss and said, our
program can do that for you, and we can keep the records. And we can actually
analyze that stuff for you, and if you were trying to, and actually, programs like football
and all had equipment to do some of the stuff that we had, but they didn’t know how
to use it, quite honestly. I mean they had a Bod
Pod for body composition, and no one ever used it. In fact they gave it to us because they didn’t know how to use it. And things like that, so we
can do this more efficiently, and much less money than it
would cost for you to hire a bunch of people to do this type stuff. Now, one of the things that helped us was Mac was willing to do this,
and have the football team tested there, and gave,
put a trust in us that this information, first
we would do a good job, but second, this information
would be held within our FIT program, and within athletics, and he could trust us,
and that’s a big part of working with athletics is
the trust in outside people coming in and doing things, and
keeping it within athletics. And once football started
doing it, then basketball wanted to do it, and then
baseball, and so forth. As that, we got paid per player that we, or athlete that we tested, basically, and that program goes on today. But without the cooperation
of Mack and football, that would have never happened, probably, or it would have been a lot longer. But the spirit here, and him doing that, led for other programs to get involved. The third thing that
we did was we started a Masters of Science program in sports performance and nutrition. And Doctor Ed Coyle heads that program up. What we wanted there was
to work with athletics so that we had, a lot of
the people in this program want to be strength coaches
and sports nutritionists, and things of that nature. And so working with
athletics is very important, and getting an internship
is very important. So we actually went to
athletics, and talked about, well we’ve got this
program, we need to intern these Master’s students to work in your program, if possible. And again, I went to Mack,
and I went to Jeff Madden, who was this head strength coach at Texas, and we talked about this. And again, trust is really important. At first, there was hesitation,
particularly from Jeff, and he didn’t want any
outside people coming in into his territory, but, over
time we developed that trust. And I think that it became very, and football was the first one to do this. And again, it was once
our kids got in there, and they saw the quality and the knowledge that these kids had, and
the desire that they had, they work ethic they had, it
became sort of a no-brainer to have these interns
in there, helping out. Not only that, athletics was
willing to actually give us a couple of, give us
money to actually support some graduate research
assistants in that program, which helped us a lot. After football started,
then we had internships in basketball, we had
internships in women’s soccer, women’s basketball,
volleyball, and so forth. But it all started with
Coach Brown, and Jeff Madden. That’s kind of the situation we were in, my role, as facilitator really, and try to get these interactions,
I wanted the interactions with athletics, but a
couple of things I learned along the way from that, is… The athletic department will
work with academic programs, when there is a clear benefit
to the athletic program. But, academic programs
should not work with athletic departments, unless
there’s a clear benefit for them as well. So, I wasn’t gonna take my
department staff and so forth, and our facilities and our knowledge, and give it away for free. Just as they wanted
quality, and this assures a couple of things. One, it assures respect from
the athletic department. If they aren’t willing to pay for it, they’re not respecting my
knowledge, and what I can do, and if I do do something,
there’s no guarantee that they’re gonna pay
any attention to it. It’s just like anything else in life. If you don’t pay anything for it, if there’s no price for
it, you don’t value it. My wife, I’ll tell you
this story real quickly. My wife has a uncle,
he’s since deceased, but, and my conversations with him were pretty enlightening at times. I thought he was a very smart guy. He had a seat on the
New York Stock Exchange, I’ve told this story this morning when I was talking to Guy’s group. He had a seat on the
New York Stock Exchange. And he decided to give that
up and start his own business. And his business was to monitor
the people that were seated on the stock exchange for other companies, and to evaluate their performance, and give that information
back to the companies, as well as projections of
how the company was gonna do. And he went around to all these companies to try to get people
to pay him to do this, for his services, and
couldn’t get anybody to do it. He thought he was gonna go broke, he said. And he finally, he went
to a friend and he said, and I don’t remember the guy’s name, but let’s just say it was Lenny. He says, “Lenny, I don’t understand it, “I’m providing a really wonderful service, “it’s a unique idea, why
aren’t companies interested?” He said, “Because you’re not worth it.” He says, “What do you mean?” He says, “Well you’re
not charging anything. “There’s no value here,
they don’t see any value, “they think that it’s just a scam because “you’re not charging
as much as you should.” So he told me, he says,
“So I raised the rate “to join my company, for me
to do this service for ’em, “by fivefold.” He said, “I had more business
than I knew what to do with.” Alright, there was value in it, now. They were paying for something,
they were interested in it, and they thought it was worthwhile, because they had to pay for it. And I think that’s the way,
and he said one other thing. He says, “You’re only worth
what you think you are.” Now think about that for a
minute, you’re only worth what you think you are. You’re not gonna increase your worth, if you think you’re at a low
level, you’ve gotta think big. So I thought that way about my department. My department’s a good department, I’ve got excellent people,
we’ve got excellent knowledge, we can help, but we
need to be paid for it. The other thing is, that pay does not necessarily mean in money. There’s a number of ways
that there’s payment. You know, like providing
scholarships and so far, but I never asked anything
for me personally, from the athletic department, never. But the athletic department
was very nice to me, I can say in fact, when we
won the national championship in 2005, I got a championship
ring, which I’m very proud of. And Mack had a lot to do with that. But that was because of my contributions to the program overall. The other thing that, there
was a couple other programs that I did, personally, like
I helped the nutritionists set up nutrient timing programs
for all the athletic teams, what supplements needed to be provided during competition, what
needed to be provided post-competition for recovery, and also for training purposes,
and those type of things. And so, there was this
really nice interaction. And up until I left, I
really enjoyed my interaction with athletics, they were
a great group to work with, and once you get into the door, once trust is between the
parties, is established. The other thing, where I think it’s going, is that I think it’s gonna
be more collaboration between academics and
athletics in the future. And that’s gonna occur through
a couple of mechanisms, one is through possibly setting up what I call performance teams. So I think athletic directors
will come in and they will ask for faculty to be part of a council, to help them make decisions
on problems that arise. “Well we’ve got a
situation with this team, “there’s a lot of
bulimia that’s occurring, “what could we do?” Or, “This team doesn’t
seem to be improving, “there are a lot of
injuries, what’s going on?” And so there can be an
athletic council made up of exercise physiologists, biomechanists, motor control specialists, orthopedists, athletic trainers and so
forth from the faculty, that can give advice along these lines. The other way I see it
is setting up what I call high performance training programs. And actually I pushed this
at the University of Texas the year before I left,
I met with the provost, the athletic director, vice
president for facilities, and our dean, the dean of my college, and I talked about the structure of this high performance center, and
how it could be of benefit to the athletic program, and the athletes. I just wrote this mission. Actually I was, after I retired,
I was asked by Tom Osborne to come up and give
this presentation to him and a couple of other people,
as to what this center would look like, like I
did at University of Texas. The way Tom found out about
it is a good friend of mine, Dave Ellis was the first
sports nutritionist hired by any college for athletic teams, not dietician, but sports nutritionist, and it was Tom Osborne had
hired Dave at Nebraska. And Dave left after Tom retired, I don’t know if you know, Tom went on to be a senator or representative
of the the state in Congress, and then came back as athletic director. So I went up and talked
to Tom about this program. But anyway, so it was something like the mission would be the West
Virginia University Center for Athletic Excellence
seeks to enhance the athletic performance and quality of
life for the student athlete through research instruction
service in the areas of exercise training,
recovery, skill acquisition, health screening, care, nutrition, and rehabilitative medicine. And so, set up this program,
and I won’t go into detail about it, but, you know,
it has a major impact, a research component,
an in-service component, and a practical aspect
component, that work together, along with a corps of faculty
that help with the research, and help with the in-service programs. And I think that you can design
some really great programs where you take advantage
of the knowledge and skills that are in kinesiology departments, and biology departments, and so forth, that can be applied to athletics, and bring forth, quickly, the
new advances in those areas. Usually when something’s
published, it takes 10 years to get to where it’s practically used. Of course that’s speeded up
now with technology, but, it really takes a long time,
whereas you can do that right away, and
particularly if you’re doing the research yourself. In summary then, what I
basically can say, is that if you’re gonna work with athletics, one, and you’re working with athletic teams, you need to work with the head coach, you might have to get
the head coach onboard with what’s going on. It’s not gonna work unless you do. You need to establish clear objectives, and everybody be on the
same page with this, and have the support of the
coach’s staff and players. You need to be compensated
fairly for this, and by being compensated,
one of the key things is if you’re gonna do something for somebody, it usually costs money to do it, and you can’t do a quality
job unless you have the money to do that job. So that’s another aspect
that has to be considered, not just the value that
you have, but also, what you need to do a good job. I forgot about one other program,
I just want to talk about in our masters program
that I was talking about, physical performance and strength. We actually did, Coach Brown
was very concerned about dehydration problems at Texas,
for two-a-day practices, and so forth. And our program came over,
did testing on the athletes, figured out water loss, electrolyte loss, figured out how much fluid
needed to be consumed, and electrolyte concentrations
needed to be consumed each day to replenish those, so that dehydration wouldn’t occur. And we were able to figure
that out per player, in other words, we could
actually develop specific drinks, recovery drinks, for the players,
based on that information. That’s great information to have. Another time we were
asked to do some testing with women’s soccer, at
the end of the season, performance was falling. We did testing there to
figure out what was going on, and we came up, and it helped us a lot, if we found out that they
were being overtrained, power was falling off, and
we found that measuring muscle power was a simple way
of determining overtraining. And we got the coaches to
back off on the training, and so forth. Coaches in general, if
performance is falling off, what do they do, they want
to work you harder, right. We got the coaches to back off, performances went back up. So there’s a lot to be gained,
with working with athletics. It has to be on a mutual
basis, though I think, I can stand up here
and tell you right now, that the things that we did at
Texas would not have occurred without the help of Coach Brown and DeLoss Dodds, athletic director. So, thank you very much. (group applauds) – Sir. – Thank you, Doctor Ivy. I will try to be brief. Before I go over just a
small piece of Coach Brown’s accomplishments as a football coach, last night I had the privilege
of joining Doctor Wayda in picking Coach Brown up from
the airport at Pittsburgh, and so we’re driving
back here to Morgantown, got to spend just a little
bit of time with him, and a couple things
really came across that we try to get across to our students, in the coaching major. And that is, one, Coach Brown
is incredibly passionate about what he does. Even after he stepped away from coaching, being a coach is still who he is. And then also, we really try to preach doing things the right way,
and I think that you know, our students with social
media, and the news cycles, there’s so much negativity
out there nowadays, and everyone seemingly wants to focus on these negative things,
and the controversies, and let’s kind of talk
about, not necessarily the great things about
sport, and the great things about coaching, and the
great things about developing young people through sport. That really came across in
getting to talk to Coach Brown for that little bit there. But just briefly, Coach Brown has been the head football coach at
Appalachian State University, Tulane University, of Tulane,
University of North Carolina and probably where he’s most known for is University of Texas from 1998 to 2013. Coach Brown is a national
champion, the 2005 team, winning the Rose Bowl in
2006, one of the most famous college football games of all time, when they beat University
of Southern California. 20 consecutive win seasons, 17
consecutive bowl appearances, from 2000 and 2010, spent 169 of 192 weeks in the coaches football Top 25. He’s mentored coaches such Will Muschamp, Greg Robinson, Gene Chizik, Joe Philbin, among many many many others. He most recently was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, and he currently is an analyst for ESPN. Ladies and gentlemen, Coach Brown. (group applauds) – Thank you, Guy. I’ll start by saying
congratulations to you students that are here on a Friday
afternoon, ’cause that’s unusual. So I appreciate ya, and what
you do when you take a step to go beyond where are all
the other students are, wherever they are,
drinking this afternoon. It gives you a step up, so,
don’t take that for granted. Any time you have an
opportunity to sit and listen to a superstar like Doctor Ivy, use it, because you need that knowledge. What we did, is Coach
Nehlen has been so good to all of us, that he taught us so much, we learned from him so much,
he’s classy, he’s smart, he always did it the right way and he won, and he always gave back to us. So I appreciate you,
Coach, love you, Coach, and I came because of you,
I can promise you that, because you mean so much
to me and my family, and you’ve done so much
not only for this place, but for college sports, and you
always did it the right way, and we appreciate it. And the other thing I would
say, Valerie, Christina, Guy, you guys have been
great, so, thank you for putting this on, and I’ll be brief, I’ve got two or three things that I think are really important. As you look at college football right now, when I started back at
North Carolina in 1988, you had five to seven years
to build your program. Now you’ve got three. So if you’re gonna work with
football coaches in general, they’re gonna need for
you, as Doctor Ivy said, to show them some immediate results. What can you do to help me. ‘Cause I don’t have very long. So now they’re offering freshman
and high school recruiting, when you get your recruits
in, you usually hit on about 50% of your recruits. If you’re playing like West
Virginia is, in the Big 12, then you’ve got teams that are
running 90, 100 plays a game, so you’ve gotta have depth. So the key to that coaching,
to get one of these, and I brought this for ya. You got good hands? Good hands, that’s good, gotta catch it. Pass the national championship
ring so everybody can see it, and I’ve never lost it, so
get it back to me please. I don’t want to say West
Virginia’s the only place that stole my ring, so
I don’t want to do that as we get through. But those are hard to get, and to do that, you’ve gotta have everybody
involved on the team. It’s gotta work. So, what we looked at
early, is how do we get the best development for our players, how do we get our guys
bigger, stronger, and faster, after we get ’em there, how
do we get ’em more flexible, and how do we get ’em to play
at maximum speed and strength, and stay healthy. Because if you’re a healthy
team, if you’re good enough and healthy, you’ve got a chance
to get one of those rings. If not, if you lose a lot of players, we lost 15 starters my
last year as a head coach. 15, and it just freakish that it happened, it had nothing to do with
anything that were doing, except we had lost our edge in recruiting, and didn’t have as much
depth, in my opinion. So when you start looking at that, and you go back and look
for people on your campus, like you all, that are on the cutting edge of nutrition, strength,
stretching, and so forth, to give you an advantage
over other schools. I remember early there was
a young man on our team named Leonard Davis, he
played for the Cowboys. He was six foot eight,
and listen to me now, he was 383 pounds. I used to say he was 283
pounds ’cause I couldn’t fathom him being 383 pounds, so
I’d never get it right. I’d say he’s 283 pounds, they’d say, “Coach, he’s 383 pounds.” And we actually nearly killed him one day. In the off-season program,
because he was too big, we thought, and we were trying
to get him to lose weight. What we didn’t understand is
he didn’t need to lose weight, he needed to get in shape. So we were wrong and they put
him and packed him in ice, took him to the hospital,
and we had to keep him alive until we got people like
Doctor Ivy involved, and we found out that what
we were looking at was wrong, we needed to look at body composition, not how big he was. He was that big, and
he could play that big. And we need to embrace him being that big, and not have him eating lettuce, ’cause he wouldn’t even eat it anyway, Leonard like barbecue, and
he liked the good stuff that a good Texas guy likes,
but he could play at two, at 300, excuse me, and 83 pounds. And we absolutely nearly killed
him because of our ignorance of body composition. So, we got with Doctor Ivy and his group, and you all know these things,
but he started skin calipers, he started hydrostatic
weight, the Pod Pod, the DEXA scan bone density,
and we would actually text our kids, as soon as
they would get those results, and I talked to the staff
at West Virginia today, we took pictures of kids
when they got there, and then we would take a picture
after the first six months, after the first year,
and such, to let them see how much improvement they’d made. And then they started eating right, because they liked the results. But you’ve gotta show them
some results before it’ll work, and all of these things happened
for us in a positive way. Doc also tested, because
it’s really hot in Texas, and we were trying to figure
out how do we have two-a-day practices in 107 degree
heat, and not kill ’em. And do you get them in shape,
or do you wear ’em out. And there’s a fine line between the two. Our first three or four years there, we were playing really poorly
at the first of the season, and I thought we were
out of shape, in essence, we were exhausted. They were tired because we’d had ’em out in the heat too long. So we actually went to Doctor
Ivy, we went to the Saints, we went to the Jacksonville Jaguars, we went to Houston
Texans, we went to people who were training in
the heat, and asked them what they would do, and
they actually told us keep ’em out in the heat for an hour, and take ’em inside your
indoor air for an hour. They told us the last 10
days before the first game, keep ’em indoors. They’re already in shape. So what you need to do
is get their legs back, you need to be fresh, when you play. And one of the things we
always prided ourselves, we played in 20-something
bowls, we always prided ourself to be a better team at the end of the year and more fresh at the end of the year than we were at the beginning of the year. Even when we’d lost a
couple of bowl games, I tried to find out who was
winning the most bowl games, it was Bobby Bowden at Florida State, and it was Wisconsin, Barry Alvarez. So I actually got on a plane,
I went to see Coach Bowden, I said I know you’ve got good players, but tell me why you’re
winning all the bowl games and all the rest of us aren’t? I went to Wisconsin,
I sat down with Barry, and I said, you’re winning
all the bowl games, how are you doing that? And both of ’em said the
same thing, they said that “What we do is while we’re at home, “we’re gonna have like two-a-days. “We’re gonna work the
guys really, really hard, “they’re gonna have a short
break to go home for Christmas, “and then at the bowl game, we’re gonna do “absolutely nothing
but review and stretch, “and make sure we’re
fresh for the ball game, “because at the bowl
games, too many people “are walking around, you
don’t have your routine, “you don’t have your sleep,
and the freshest team “at the bowl game wins.” And I think we we won seven
out of eight, after that. Because we were more fresh
in the fourth quarter than the other teams, and
it just made sense for us. So when we started looking at hydration, ’cause we had kids with cramps, and then they’d have the cramp,
and they’d pull a hamstring, and heat was such an issue
for us in early ball games, we went to Doc and he
started testing for VO2 max, sweat levels, hydration levels,
which would help us prevent the cramping and the muscle
strains and the pulls, and you pull a hamstring
early, you may be gone for the year, ’cause it’s hard to practice and stay in shape with a hamstring pull. So it could cost you for the entire year. He’d check fluid levels,
the electrolyte protocol. With a lot of the kids, modern
day, there were some kids that were dropping, and they were dying, because they had a sickle cell trait. We didn’t know that. Doctor Ivy got with our guys
and we started testing that for every player, when they
would show up at Texas, and we would know who had
the sickle cell trait, you had to watch ’em more carefully, you had to test them out on the field to check their heat levels,
and you had to pull ’em out. You just pulled them
out of practice earlier. And we had some great
players that couldn’t play early in the season as
much as the other kids, and we needed to know that. The assistant coach had to
know you can’t push the guy beyond where he is, or he sure
wouldn’t be a good player, but he also might die, and
then you had to go back and try to figure out recovery. How hard could you push,
and then get ’em to recover and restore their legs and their energy. Doc mentioned nutrient timing before, and he is the one that
started these protein shakes, and he’s the one that started
getting nuts and fruits and different things in the
weight rooms across the country. Because no coach, everybody
thought that was too soft. And when we started protein smoothies, people even started laughing at us, about they’re giving these
kids smoothies, they’re soft. It was absolutely about nutrition. And then Doc even started snacks,
because eating differently and at different times of
the day were very important. He started with certain
kids having protein shakes an hour before ball games,
which would give them a little bit more that they could eat. I remember we played
Brigham Young one night, in our last year at Texas, and there was an hour and 45 minute
delay, and we were in the dressing room, we kept
’em in their uniforms, it was hot, we didn’t
feed them, and we stunk. We absolutely stunk in the ball game. Five weeks, six weeks
later we played at TCU, there’s a three hour and
fifteen minute delay. And we took all their clothes off, we had ’em shower, we fed ’em, we had ’em get their music,
we had ’em get relaxed, we had ’em re-stretch, and
we won the game 30 to six. So, there’s so many things
that you and your careers will be able to help your
football program with, if you can just bring
it to them and convince your head coach that
you’re gonna help him win. ‘Cause that’s all he’s gonna want. He’s gonna want your trust,
Doctor Ivy never ever gave any information, in my 16 years out, about any of our players, except to us. And the paranoia with coaches
is, I don’t need on the street that so-and-so is too heavy. I don’t need, on the
streets, that this kid’s got the sickle cell trait. We don’t need that out, so you
have to have complete trust in the people that you’re talking to. Doc also helped us with
how to feed our guys with pre-practice, with
workouts, and he actually started the pre-game meal and taught
us to move it back four hours before the game. And what to eat, and all of those things are very, very important as you go to it, and the other thing that he
did, is, in my time at Texas, he actually talked to DeLoss
Dodds, our athletics director, into getting us a nutritionist, Amy Culp, and she’s really smart,
and she was really good. She was kind of a part-time
person, we got her full time, and now there’s five
full-time nutritionists, in the Texas athletic department, and it does make a difference. And it can win football games. So when you start looking at your job, and this department, as it compares to major college football
programs, like a West Virginia, like a Texas, as Doc said, number one, you gotta gain trust. Number two, you gotta have a plan and convince the head
coach that you’re worth it, you’re gonna help him win football games, and tell him why, and then show him why. And then follow through with
it, and be part of the team. And I think that’s the most
important thing for us. We wouldn’t have won the
national championship in my estimation, near as
easily, unless we’d had Doctor Ivy and our kinesiology
department involved, and onboard, and they
were part of the family, and part of the team,
and it made sense for us, they’re right there, and they
cared, they wanted to win. And that’s the other thing,
you’ve gotta pull for your group and your team, you don’t
want somebody around that doesn’t care whether you win or not. It is important that you win. And that is the bottom line,
you want to treat guys right, you want to do everything
right, but, for it to work, you have to win. And for you to stay in the long term. We even had Jeff Madden and Bennie Wylie, were very good friends, and
very respectful of Doctor Ivy, but we had a guy who donated all the money for our weight room, who
was from Saudi Arabia, named Doctor Rashid, and he was worth eight billion dollars,
and he came in and said, get what you want, well
that was a mistake, ’cause we nearly spent
the eight billion I think, they said we had an unlimited
budget, and we went over it. But what Doctor Rashid
did, because Doctor Ivy and his group were so
important in our progress at the University of Texas,
Doctor Rashid actually gave three scholarships in
mine and Sally’s name to the kinesiology department, because they were that important to us. So, you can’t just talk about it, you can’t say you’re gonna do it, you’ve gotta step up and do
it right if it’s gonna work. Guy. (group applauds) – Thanks for the kind words. (speaks faintly) – They’re all true. – Thanks Coach. – Thank you. – Alright, we have about 20 minutes, we’re gonna open it up to
the floor for questions. Doctor Ivy, Coach Brown,
be a conversation, it can be something related
to what they talked about. I don’t think I need to moderate, I think I can let you guys take it. – It’s up to you. – Let’s, the way these
things usually work, usually that the first question or two is a little bit difficult,
and then after that, things get going, so, does anybody have a question? – Yeah. (person speaks faintly) – Was really respected, one
of the greatest powerlifters of all time. (person speaks faintly) – Well, yeah, Terry was in
the department of kinesiology, and he and Jan Todd started the, oh, can’t remember what
the, but it was library of, and exhibits of weight
training and conditioning, and so forth there,
it’s a tremendous museum that they’ve started. Terry was an athlete at
the University of Texas. His major role, in the department,
he taught sports history, and he taught history
of athletic training, and strength and so forth. His interaction, early on,
when I first got there, he was doing some work
with athletics, but, it was mainly setting up the
library, and getting that going is his major work when I was there. (person speaks faintly) – That they were what? – How did you monitor
the players to make sure they were doing their part? – Oh, well, you know,
like I said, early on when there was no
cooperation from the coach, and getting the players to be
cooperative, there wasn’t any. But, you know, with Coach
Brown and his staff, when we were working with athletics there, it was passed down, Coach
Brown tells Coach Madden that the players will do this,
the players will do that. The monitoring of the players,
I mean, they would show up, they were actually very good,
and all the stuff that we did for football, and also the other programs, once that started. Having the head coach behind
it, made all the difference in the world, the players
knew that it was important. But as Coach Brown said, when
we were providing results, that was important as well,
and so there’s more cooperation when you feel better,
performances are going up, and so forth. I know that a lot of the
players that we tested with the, when we were looking at the dehydration, the sickle cell stuff, and so forth, we found out that some players were losing tremendous amounts of electrolytes, and there was no way
they were replacing those in their diet. And so we were able to
actually set up specific drinks for specific players. And when they saw they
felt better the next day, their performance is going
up, then when that happens, compliance is easy, and
keeping up with that. But we kept diligent records,
so you can go there today and you can pull out all the records. But, as Coach Brown said,
they’re in our department, and they’re in athletics, and
that’s where they’ll stay. But they’re all there. – And our guys knew it,
every coach looked at all of the data, they knew
exactly when their player was gaining weight, when he was not. They knew how flexible he
was, they knew how much body composition he had, if he was too heavy. And they talked to them
about it every day. We had every young man
weigh before every practice, and after every practice,
and it was mandatory. And if Doc had a drink for ’em, we had it in his meeting
room when he came. We had it in his locker. So we would make them drink
the bottles of whatever, before they practiced, and
immediately afterwards. I think again, if I
could tell you something, if you’re gonna be working
with football coaches who are busy, paranoid, and
egotistical in some ways, very busy, you’re gonna
to get their attention to where they buy into
it, because if they don’t, nobody else will. And our players knew that
it was very, very important, but also if you make the
coach feel like it’s gonna help him win, he’ll do it. If you make him feel like that
he’s gonna make the player feel like it helps him
win, and then you’ve got the whole package,
because if a player thinks you’re giving him an
advantage, he’s gonna take it. All of ’em want to be in the NFL, and all of ’em want to win all the games. And if you can help ’em
do that, they’re all in. – Yes. – Yeah, this a question for Coach Brown. So next season I’m actually
doing an internship. (person speaks faintly) And I’m just kind of
curious, what are some things that you look for. (person speaks faintly) – What do you look for in young people, that you’re gonna hire
’em and recommend ’em for other jobs, and the
thing you just said, too, if you do a great job,
you don’t have to ask ’em to recommend you, they will. And if you’re having to go in and ask ’em, it’s probably not working very well. I would say number one, passion. They’re gonna want you to know that, they’re gonna wanna know
from you that you are very passionate about your job and what you do. They want you to be positive. They want you to have high energy. They want you to be knowledgeable. They want you to be very confidential. And they want you to be a
positive for the program, not a neutral, or not a negative. And I brought a staff member in one time, because he was a very good staff member, but he was miserable,
and he made me miserable. And I didn’t like to see him. And he’s still there, I
saw him the other day. And I brought him in, it
was about the third year, and I said, you know
what, you’re so miserable, you never smile, you’re
always talking about how miserable you are here,
I can get somebody else. So you either get happy,
and get happy fast, and don’t you ever come
in here griping again, or I’m gonna fire you. And I will say from, that
was about my third year, and 17 years later, from
that day, until now, every time I see him he says, “Hey Coach! “How are you? “It’s great to see ya.” And I said, good, even
if you’re miserable, I don’t want to see it. You need to be a positive, be a positive, bring something that he can’t
get without you being there. And that’s what I used to hire people and pay ’em for that reason. Somebody would say, “You’re
not giving me enough money.” And I said, I’m paying you
what you’re worth to me. So don’t gripe about
not making enough money, bring ’em something
that they’re gonna worry about you leaving enough that
they’re gonna pay you to stay. – Coach Brown, please
explain your stand on drugs. – Yes sir, my stand on drugs. We have a drug problem in society, there’s no question about that. What our dear professor is talking about, as I said one time, if we
know that someone is using or been involved with drugs,
we’re not gonna recruit them. And it is a real problem,
not with football players, but with students, with
people, across our country. And I think, at some point,
we’ve all gotta stand up, and take a stand, or it’s
gonna take over our country. And it really, really is a concern, to me, with all of us, and a lot of
times, the younger people, when they come to college, are
not old enough to understand whether they can handle it or not, and then they get addicted,
and they got a problem for the rest of their lives,
or it changes their lives, or they get in trouble. So I was constantly talking to our guys, constantly talking to
our guys about drugs, and we would talk to
’em about legal drugs, prescription drugs, and illegal drugs. I’m 66, I’ve still never
smoked a joint in my life, and people look at me and say,
“Well you’re missing out.” And I said, well maybe I
am, I was telling the guys at lunch today that,
in one of our meetings, we had a couple of guys that
had a positive for marijuana, and I came into the team
meeting, and I was so mad, I said, that stuff must be so good, it must be so good that
you’ll give up your life, you’ll give up your scholarship,
you’re gonna embarrass your family, you’re gonna
get kicked out of school, one of these days when I
quit, I’m gonna get Sally to put me in a room, and I’m
just gonna smoke it all day, and do that, and they
all giggled of course, and I was so mad, and I slammed
the door and walked out, and Sally said, “You just told
’em you’re gonna smoke dope, “do you realize that?” But I just, we’ve gotta stop
it, and we’ve gotta stand up and stop it and be strong. It’s already out of control,
and I’ve got six grandkids and four children, and
there’s been some involvement with drugs in some of their
lives, the children of course, and it’s dangerous. Boy it is really dangerous. So, if you’ve got somebody that’s on it, or they’re trying to get you on it, you need to step up and try to stop them, if you can’t stop them, if
you can’t get ’em any help, I’d go get other friends. (person speaks faintly) – Bigger, stronger, faster. – In case the folks in
the back didn’t hear– – What’s the changes in college athletes since the time we started, and now? And they are bigger, stronger, faster. I remember my freshman
year playing football, and in college and the biggest
player on the team was 275. He was a defensive tackle. Today he might be a linebacker
or something, I don’t know. (laughs) But, it was a lot different
then, and they are, they’re bigger, stronger, faster,
there’s no doubt about it. It’s better training, better nutrition, and the advances that have
occurred in exercise science and training, and what we
know about how training adaptation occurs, and the
influence of different nutrition, you know, I can think about
when I was an athlete, and I think Coach Brown was
probably the same way is, the last thing we thought
about was nutrition. I just ate ’cause I was
hungry, but we didn’t have any supplements, and we didn’t
take anything prior to a game to improve performance or
supplements post-exercise, training to enhance training
adaptation and recovery, and those types of things. It wasn’t anything, and there
was no sports nutritionists or anything like that. So, you know, it’s tremendous advances that occurred, in general. And also the popularity
of major college sports. I talked earlier about Yale
in 1906 had a budget of, football brought in $106,000, which was 1/8 the budget of Yale. Today there are athletic programs, and the collegiate athletic
programs in the country that are almost, and maybe
topping it now, I’m not sure, the last I saw was 2015, but, there are some that
had budgets of close to 200 million dollars a year. Athletics is big business
now, big business and the schools know this. And there’s a heck of a lot
of pressure on the coaches, as Coach Brown can attest. People don’t understand how much pressure, and how much work these guys
put in to prepare their teams, year-round, not just during the season. – I would say the biggest difference that I see is selfishness. I never thought I would
see football players leaving their team, and
not playing in a bowl game, because it might get them hurt,
and they won’t get to play in the NFL. We had Ricky Williams, that
played in the Cotton Bowl, and then went to a College
All-Star Game afterwards. We had Cedric Benson, who
was a great player for us, who was an All-American,
we’re playing Michigan in the Rose Bowl, and
he hyperextends his knee on the first play. They bring him out, he limps
off, the doctors look at it, they said, “You’re a number one pick, “probably be taken in the top 10, “you should not play in this ball game.” And he said, tape it up, I’m
not missing this ball game. So he plays against Michigan. Didn’t play great, but he played. After the game, I’m leaving
the dressing room late, I’m about the last one, he’s
sitting over there by himself, we win the game, three or four points. And he’s sitting over
there crying in the corner. And I’m really concerned
that he’s ruined his knee. I walked over and I sat down next to him, and I said, are you
okay, and he said, “Yes.” And I said, is your knee
hurting, and he said, “No.” And I said, why are you crying? And he said, “This is the last
time I’ll ever get to wear “a Texas football uniform.” And I’m crushed. And we’re losing that, social media is promoting each individual. As Doc just said, the
college game, and football, and basketball, is getting
more like the NBA and the NFL, and it’s all about money. And I’m really, really concerned
about where it’s going. I couldn’t coach a guy who
came in to me, and said, “I’m not playing in the game, “because I’m looking for the NFL.” I would throw up. I couldn’t do it. I can’t even fathom that. I get in trouble on TV,
because the pro guy, Booger McFarland sitting next to me, says, “Yeah man, I’d take the money, I’d go.” I can’t stand it. It’s not the way we meant
for this sport to be, it’s not about team. – Ryan. – And sorry I didn’t
mean to take off on that, but that’s, get a little
passionate about it. (person speaks faintly) Is there any year where I
thought I did everything perfect, and just had a bad season? Not really. We always make mistakes. And about the time you think
you’re doing everything right, that’s when you get in trouble. About the time you think it
can’t happen is when it happens. I do remember years
when we were recruiting and we were so good and so deep, that I didn’t think we
needed the recruits, because we had so many good players. I didn’t know when they
were going to play, but I do know that when
you’re really, really good, I said you have to be great,
and healthy, and lucky, but really and truly you’ve
got to be good enough, at least two deep, so that
you win enough of the games, and everybody gets to
play, and they get better. And if someone, everybody wants to play. And if you think about this,
and the sport of football, and this will be really
important for you all in your careers, there’s
130 players basically, on major college football
teams, and only 11 get to play at a time. Everybody else is mad, ’cause
they’re standing, watching. So, when you start looking at football, morale on the football
team is a real problem, because there’s a lot more
standing than playing. And when you can win enough
games that you can play at least 44, or 60, that’s
when you get to be good because everybody gets
better, ’cause they know they have a chance to play. But when you’re losing,
and only playing 12 or 15 on each side of the ball,
you’ve got a miserable team, you’ve got a bad locker room,
and you don’t have any depth. And we got in trouble in those years where I didn’t play enough players. And in fact, at one time, we
would take our second team players, and we never
called ’em second teamers, we always had different
colors for ’em, or the Cowboys and the Longhorns, or
something, we never said twos, ’cause you don’t want to call a guy a two, and then he plays like
a two, and you’re mad that he plays like a two, well
that’s what you named him. So name him something else. And we called every team the
orange team, the white team, the Stampede, the Rangers, so we had some, a name for each team. But what I would do is force the coaches, because they’re so afraid
of getting fired and losing, I would force the coaches
to put that entire team in, early in the ball game. So I had a rule that every third series, you had to play the quote
backups, and force yourself into playing ’em. And the truth, and what’s your name? – Matt. – Matt, what Matt and I were
talking about, the truth is, if I’m an assistant coach, and
I’m not helping my position player get better against the other team, what am I worth to him? Same thing for you. If you’re not helping him get better, you’re not worth anything to him. So I told our assistant
coaches, unless you can give him something to make him
better, on the field, he not gonna listen to you. And if you say he’s not listening to me, it’s ’cause you’re not
giving him anything. Give him something. And I thought that was really important. – We have time for one
more question, Natasha. (person speaks faintly) – Natasha, what advice would
I give to my younger self? This is one that’s tricky,
that I think is important to all of ya, is I tell young coaches now, you need to enjoy the
journey, enjoy the ride more. And I’m not sure you can, and
push yourself at the level you gotta push yourself. I don’t remember, I
remember enjoying wins, but Coach Darrell Royal, who won three national
championships at Texas, and the stadium’s named after him, I asked him why he quit at 52 years old, after only 20 years as a
head coach, and he said, “I quit because the wins were a relief, “and the losses were disastrous, “so there was no joy in my life.” And we won, we had nine, 10
years of 10 or more wins, and we were winning so much,
that if you’re not careful, you lose who you are, and you
start making your identity more about how many games you win, and how many people you please, than how many lives you touch. So I think if, instead of
staying enjoy the journey, ’cause you, I would get,
we would win a big game, and I would get on the plane to go home, and start thinking about the next game. There is no doubt in my mind, or I was in the press conference, and I’d be slipping, we won a game here my
last year in overtime, we lost two, maybe four great players, four starters that night, I was miserable, and we won an overtime game,
it’s the only overtime game I ever coached, and I
should have been happy, but I was worried more about
that, and Oklahoma State the next week, and I
know you have to continue to push yourself for it to work, you can’t get complacent,
but I think you’ve got to make sure that the
reason that you’re doing what you’re doing is that you want to help people go from where they
are to somewhere else, and you can’t lose that perspective, because if you lose it, and
it gets only about wins, you’re not gonna be happy,
’cause you’re not gonna win all the time. I asked Phil Mickelson,
who’s a good friend, about a month ago, what
do you have to know to be a great golfer? And he said, “You gotta learn how to lose. “‘Cause we’re gonna lose most of the time, “and when you lose, you
can’t go in the tank, “you gotta go be better.” And I see these great golfers
at Augusta, let’s say, and they’re through on
Saturday and they’re out. And they shoot their best game on Sunday, because they’re working on next week. They didn’t quit, they didn’t get mad, they didn’t shut it down. So, my advice would be, if
you’re gonna get into this, it’s hard, and it’s
gonna take a lot of time, a lot of energy, but if
you’re gonna do that, figure out why you’re in it. Why are you passionate
about it, and if you are, don’t lose that. At some point, winning got so important that I think I lost pieces of other things that were important to me. (person speaks faintly) I’m sorry. – Did you get it back? – You know, I did get it back. And it was funny that we
didn’t win as many in the end, we were only winning eight, nine, 10, and, to me, I probably did a better job in some of those instances,
I think with, Natasha, one of the things that happened to me, we were 25 and two,
when we lost to Alabama, that was the second loss for
that team in ’08 and ’09, we lost to Alabama, in the
national championship game, and I was absolutely miserable. The most miserable I’ve ever been, and I don’t think in looking
back I gave the credit to that team for winning 25
games, that I should have, because it was more about, we didn’t win the national championship. And you can’t go in to the
season, thinking if you don’t win the national championship,
you haven’t done a good job. And even that night,
those kids fought so hard, we’d lose Colt McCoy in
the 5th play of the game, we nearly win the game. And I didn’t give ’em the
credit that they deserved, and I’ll regret that the rest of my life. – Okay, thank you so much. – Thank you. (group applauds) – So, just as we wrap things
up, I’m Kristen Dieffenbach, I’m one of the associate professors in the Athletic Coaching
Education department, and the Center for Applied
Coaching and Sports Sciences that we have in CPASS and
we want to first thank Don Nehlen, of course,
for the lecture series, without this, it wouldn’t
be possible, Coach Nehlen, so thank you very much. (group applauds) And hopefully today what
you’ve really heard a lot about is that idea that science
is about innovation. Sport is also about innovation,
and the idea that sport, and science, and coaching
all come together to really bring together
that idea of innovation is just absolutely amazing. So we wanted to thank both
Coach Mack and Doctor Ivy for sharing with us how
they’ve navigated that journey, and giving us some ideas on
how we can take that forward in the practice and the work that we do. So thank you very much. (group applauds) (group members speak faintly) And then just as we wrap up,
we’re gonna be doing the raffle in just a second, but Coach Mack’s ring is not part of the raffle,
so please make sure that makes it back up to the front, and thank you all for coming.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *