Heroin Rehab Centers | Finding Quality Heroin Rehab Centers in Arizona

Heroin Rehab Centers | Finding Quality Heroin Rehab Centers in Arizona


Heroin rehab centers provide effective treatment
and support for addiction to heroin. A quality heroin addiction treatment program will offer
a variety of residential or inpatient options as well as support for detox.
Before we discuss the specifics of heroin rehab centers and what options are available,
let’s talk about the drug itself and why it’s extremely important to get help today if you
or a loved one is suffering from addiction. Heroin is a type of opioid drug that comes
from synthesizing morphine. Morphine is a substance that is naturally occurring and
is extracted from the seed pods of poppy plants. Heroin is usually a white or brown powder
or it’s a black sticky substance, known as “black tar heroin.”
According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse:
“In 2011, 4.2 million Americans aged 12 or older had used heroin at least once in their
lives. It is estimated that about 23 percent of individuals who use heroin become dependent
on it”. Heroin can be smoked (often called chasing
the dragon), it can be snorted, or injected. All three methods of taking the drug can affect
the brain very rapidly. It caused changes in the brain and can cause a person to seek
out the drug no matter what the consequences are.
When heroin enters the brain, it’s converted back into morphine and binds to the opioid
receptors. This affects the perception of pleasure and pain. These opioid receptors
are located throughout the brain, even in the brain stem, which controls such things
as blood pressure, breathing, and arousal. In fact, heroin overdoses usually involve
the suppression of breathing, which can kill you.
When a person injects heroin, they will feel an initial rush or euphoria along with heavy
feeling arms and legs, flushing of their skin, a dry mouth, and clouded thinking. After this
rush, there is an alternating between drowsy and wakeful states known as being “on the
nod”. When a person uses heroin on a regular basis,
their brain function actually changes. Tolerance occurs, where more and more of the drug is
required in order to feel the same effects. Dependence also occurs where there’s a need
to keep taking the drug to avoid the withdrawal symptoms.
There are a number of serious health conditions related to heroin abuse including death from
overdose, spontaneous abortion, and diseases like HIV and hepatitis. Someone who uses heroin
chronically may develop collapsed veins, abscesses, gastrointestinal problems, infections around
the heart, liver or kidney disease, and pneumonia. Street heroin is often mixed or cut with other
contaminants or additives that can obstruct blood vessels leading to vital organs, as
if the drug itself wasn’t enough. One can see now how heroin rehab centers can actually
save a life. Let’s discuss the signs of symptoms of heroin
abuse. Heroin creates an effect that induces (quite rapidly) a feeling of euphoria and
relaxation. Similar to other opiates, heroin blocks the ability of the brain to recognize
pain. For those who are experiencing some type of chronic pain, heroin may actually
seem like a wonder drug. Those that are heroin abusers, especially if they have a history
of prior drug abuse, may actually be able to hide the signs and symptoms of heroin use,
for a while. Anyone close to a heroin user like loved ones,
friends, and co-workers might actually notice some signs of heroin use, especially right
after they’ve taken the drug. These might include:
• Sudden changes in behavior or actions • Disorientation
• Shortness of breath • Constricted (small) pupils
• Dry mouth • They’re droopy looking, as if their extremities
are heavy • They have times of hyper alertness followed
by quickly nodding off Now these signs are not necessarily unique
to the use of heroin. The most obvious warning signs include the possession of items that
are used to prepare and then to either inject, inhale or smoke heroin. Some of these items
are: • Needles or syringes not used for other
medical reasons • Gum wrappers or aluminum foil with burn
marks • Burned spoons
• Straws with burn marks • Missing shoelaces (these are used to tie
off injection sites) • Water pipes or other pipes
• Small plastic bags, with white powdery residue
We might notice a change in a person’s behavior. Some of these behavioral indicators of heroin
use might include: • The person no longer seems interested
hobbies and favorite activities • There’s an increase in slurred, garbled
or incoherent speech • They are lying or there’s other deceptive
behavior • Hostility toward loved ones
• Withdrawal from family and friends, instead, they might be spending time with new friends
that they don’t seem to have any ties with. • There is a significant increase in their
time spent sleeping • Unusual avoidance of eye contact, or distant
field of vision • Stealing or borrowing money from loved
ones, or valuables are missing. • Wearing long pants or long sleeves to
hide needle marks, even if it’s warm outside. • They care less and less about hygiene
and physical appearance • Sudden drop in performance at school or
work • They might seem to have less self-esteem
or a worsening body image • Loss of motivation and apathy toward future
goals Those who use heroin will eventually build
up a tolerance to the drug, which causes them to use more and more often. As the tolerance
grows, more physical symptoms of heroin abuse and addiction start to show up:
• Needle marks (or tracks) visible on the arms
• Sudden weight loss • Women might stop having their menstrual
cycle • Unexplained runny nose
• Scabs, cuts or bruises from picking at the skin
• Infections or abscesses at injection site There are a variety of treatment options available
for heroin addiction, like heroin rehab centers, some types of treatment is more effective
than others. One fact that is widely accepted is that treatment is generally more effective
when the heroin abuse is identified early on.
Although behavioral and pharmaceutical treatments can both be useful when used alone, science
and research has shown us that a combination of both types of treatments will ultimately
have the greatest success. On the pharmacological side, Methadone is
probably one of the most well know treatments for opiate addiction. Methadone is itself
a synthetic opiate that can help block the effects of heroin and the withdrawal symptoms.
Because Methadone has its own addictive qualities, there have been new drugs created that are
quickly becoming more popular than Methadone for use in heroin treatment.
A combination drug, Buprenorphine/naloxone commonly known as Suboxone, is a recent addition
to the list of medications now available for treating heroin addiction. Suboxone is different
from methadone in that it offers less risk of addiction meaning it produces a lower level
of physical dependence, so patients who discontinue the medication generally have fewer withdrawal
symptoms than do those who stop taking methadone and it can be prescribed in the privacy of
a doctor’s office. Suboxone is used in the part of heroin recovery
process called detoxification: Even though heroin withdrawal is rarely fatal, the intense
withdrawal symptoms that are experienced in the first week after the last drug use can
be excruciating. This is why the use of a medication like Suboxone is important. In
fact the primary purpose of detox is to relieve the withdrawal symptoms associated with stopping
the use of heroin. While detox itself isn’t a treatment for heroin addiction, it is an
important step when it leads to treatment in long term heroin rehab centers. According
to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the best drug addiction treatment is usually found
in the residential programs that last anywhere from 3 to 6 months.
As discussed earlier, medication is only one part of successful recovery from heroin addiction.
Behavior therapy treatments are equally, if not more important for long term recovery.
There are many types of behavioral treatments available for heroin addiction. These might
involve either residential (or inpatient) and outpatient approaches. Even though long-term
residential programs have been shown to be more effective, they might not necessarily
meet the needs of everyone. It’s important to research the options to determine what’s
best for the addict. The type of behavioral therapy most often
used is called cognitive-behavioral therapy. It is designed to help modify the person’s
behaviors and expectations related to their heroin use. It will also help to improve coping
skills when confronted with various life stressors. Technology based treatments are becoming more
common like the use of Neurofeedback for helping the person to restore a degree of normalcy
to brain function and behavior. In fact, if there are heroin rehab centers that are not
using Neurofeedback in their programs, they are doing a great disservice to their clients.
Quality heroin rehab centers will understand both the power of the heroin drug itself along
with the fear and anxiety that go along with facing the emotions and life experiences which
are at the root of the heroin use. They will recognize the uniqueness of each individual
and will design a treatment program that best meets the client’s needs. They will use the
most successful tools and therapies based on the latest scientific research.
Whether you are the one struggling with heroin addiction or it’s someone you know, a loved
one or a friend. It’s important that you take steps today and research heroin rehab centers…
find one that meets YOUR needs. We highly recommend the treatment center linked to in
the description of this video for men ages 18-35. If that doesn’t apply, call them anyway
for a referral to a program that fits your requirements.

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