(California) Count Me In…On the Fight Against Underage Drinking

(California) Count Me In…On the Fight Against Underage Drinking


(Music) So, you guys going to
Steve’s party tonight? Yeah, like I would
really miss that one. His older brother always
takes care of things. Sweet, that means there
will be plenty of beer. Hey, there’s
Luke and Jess. Hey guys. We were just talking
about the party tonight. You guys going? I’m not sure. I’m thinking about it. Yeah, I don’t know. Come on, you guys
missed the last one. Yeah, I know, but… Well hey, we’re
starting early. You want some? California is a state
of great beauty, resources, and opportunity. But, unfortunately,
California is facing a great problem. A typical day in the life
of a young person living in California includes
an inundation of alcohol influences. There are TV ads,
billboards, music, and movies. Not to mention pictures
posted on social media. And then there are parents
and adults who are willing to provide alcohol, and
community norms that support underage drinking. These are just some of the
ways our youth are being exposed to alcohol. But, luckily, there are lots
of people who do care about the issue and are working to prevent underage drinking in California. Let’s take a look. Here at the Office of Traffic
Safety, we fund several programs that I believe work
in high schools. Friday Night Live, I think,
makes a huge difference. We fund real DUI trials and sentencing trials
at high schools. We fund the Department of
Alcoholic Beverage Control. They also have programs,
which include Shoulder Tap as far as enforcement. Those programs work. We have the Trace program
through the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control,
and this is a program that’s trying to find
out where that minor had their drink, and that’s an
important program that was started here several
years ago in California. So, I think those are four
examples of programs that I really believe
work in California, programs that we fund. I’ve been on the California
Highway Patrol for now almost 36 years, and with
underage drinking, it should never happen
in the first place, but we’re not naïve to
think it doesn’t happen; we just need help. We need help from parents,
we need help from caregivers, we need help from the
public to ensure that our children remain safe. And by that I mean not
allowing them to have alcohol, not allowing them to go to
parties where alcohol is provided, not having parties with alcohol involved with underage children. Ultimately, all of us are
indeed responsible for preventing
underage drinking. It is all of our
responsibility. As a parent, as
well as a grandparent, underage drinking is indeed
important for me, because I want to see my grandson
live a healthy life. I want to see him grow
up to have all the opportunities and make all
the right choices and all the right decisions. I think parents need to
be very careful and model their behavior, especially
when it gets to excess. Now, I’m not saying that
people shouldn’t drink when they have parties, but
parents pour into cars, parents are drinking shots,
parents are doing things; kids are absorbing everything,
and then for us to tell them, you know, don’t do this,
don’t do that-and they shouldn’t because
they’re under 21-but I just think it’s kind of
a mixed message, and we have to be very,
very, very careful. So, modeling good
behavior, I think, is extremely important. We need everyone involved
because this is a major issue. It doesn’t just impact the
child, it impacts the community. So, it has to be everybody
standing up and saying, you know what, we’re in,
we’re not going to tolerate this any longer because
it’s our children, it’s our future,
it’s our community. So, you want some? Nah, I’m good, thanks. Yeah, me too. Pshh. Whatever. Jessica and Luke are not the
only young people dealing with the pressures
of using alcohol. This kind of situation is
occurring all throughout California, and that’s
why we’re taking action. Current efforts are helping,
but we need your help too. In my community, we’re
working to reduce the use of alcohol in marketing
for community events. Where I live, we’re
working to prevent underage drinking by
changing social norms. In my county, we are in
the process of enacting a social host ordinance,
which would impose consequences to those
providing alcohol to minors. In my town, we are working
to enforce the Lee Law. We’re working with
local merchants to prevent retail access. In my local community, we
are working to educate the younger generations on the
dangers of alcohol abuse. Are you in? Are you in? Are you in? Are you in? You can count me in. You can count me in. You can count me in. (Music)

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